Questions/Comments

This site is a work in progress and a labor of love.

We are trying to compile as much information on my grandfather’s theatres as possible. My time was spent in the Forty Fort Theatre and Luzerne Theatre. So naturally, we have the most information on those two movie houses. My dad also ran the Dallas Drive-In Theatre for five years, so there is a fair amount of material there as well. The Wyoming Theatre also played a major role in history of the Alexander/Marinos cinemas. I have been in touch with family members connected to Wyoming to help add to that page.

Obtaining historical accounts or memorabilia on the other theatres presents a much greater challenge. Almost all of the family members who recall or have any artifacts connected to those cinemas have passed away. But, with the help of a few passionate friends and family members, and possibly “you,” we may just be able to fill in the gaps.

We’d love to hear your comments and questions.

Thank you,

Tom Alexander

9 Responses to Questions/Comments

  1. Steve Rundle says:

    As a kid growing up in Forty-Fort in the 1960’s a lot of time was spent at the Saturday Matinees. Some of my best memories were going to see the latest John Wayne movie with my Dad. Being dragged by my Aunt Pauline with my cousins to see the musicals and other movies she liked. Taking my first date to the movies. Just a lot of memories. Like most teenagers in the 1970’s I drifted to the theatres at the mall. But in my early 20’s I returned to the Forty-Fort theatre and realized what I was missing. The Forty-Fort Theatre and the Moonlite Drive-In were the absolute best places to see a movie. Unfortunately we lost both around the same time.

    • Richard Bartlebaugh says:

      Thanks for the great website! I went to the FF Theater a “million times.”
      Lived on Virginia Terrace, across the street from the theater from 1940-1946. I noticed the candy counter in your home picture. When we went, there was no counter. We went to Transue’s grocery store next store and loaded up with goodies. We could even go out of the theater in the middle and reload.
      I would tell Taki that we were just going over to Transue’s for a minute. He would wave us on. Then when we came back, he’d wave us in. Loved the Saturday matiness, 1-5 with Westerns, serials and cartoons. On special holidays, there was a continues show from 1 to 11. If you wanted to, you could stay in the theater after a show ended and watch again. Sometimes,
      we might enter after the show started, and then watch the next show until we saw what we missed. The Alexanders were also very nice and knew the
      names of many of the patrons.

      Thanks again, Richard Bartlebaugh

      • tom says:

        Hi Richard:

        Just recently spoke with a member of the Transue family and she echoed the story you related. My family didn’t put in a candy stand till after Mr. Transue retired. Thanks for stopping by.

    • Richard Bartlebaugh says:

      Thanks for the great website! I went to the FF Theater a “million times.”
      Lived on Virginia Terrace, across the street from the theater from 1940-1946. I noticed the candy counter in your home picture. When we went, there was no counter. We went to Transue’s grocery store next store and loaded up with goodies. We could even go out of the theater in the middle and reload.
      I would tell Taki that we were just going over to Transue’s for a minute. He would wave us on. Then when we came back, he’d wave us in. Loved the Saturday matiness, 1-5 with Westerns, serials and cartoons. On special holidays, there was a continues show from 1 to 11. If you wanted to, you could stay in the theater after a show ended and watch again. Sometimes,
      we might enter after the show started, and then watch the next show until we saw what we missed. The Alexanders were also very nice and knew the
      names of many of the patrons.

      Thanks again, Richard Bartlebaugh

    • tom says:

      Thanks Steve:

      I recall my dad saying that much of the joy he got out of the theatre business was helping (in a very small way) to make positive memories.

    • tom says:

      Thanks Steve:

      I recall my dad saying that much of the joy he got out of the theatre business was helping (in a very small way) to make positive memories..

  2. HAROLD KISHBAUGH says:

    FRED LLOYD WORKED AS THE MAN THAT RAN THE FILM PROJECTOR. FRED HAD BEEN IN VAUDEVILLE…. SAID HE WORK SHOWS WITH GEORGE BURNS.
    BILL STALEY ALSO WOULD FILLED IN. FRED WOULD TIE FLIES FOR FISHING. TRIPS.
    I NEVER HAD TO BUY A TICKET… EVERY SATURDAY I WOULD CLEAN AND
    SHINE THE BRASS ON THE INSIDE AND THE OUT SIDE DOORS TO THE LOBBY
    THERE WAS BRASS HANDLES AND BRASS PLATES.. THE PLACE WAS KEPT
    IN GREAT CONDITION AND VERY CLEAN. IF YOU CAME LATE AND THE
    FILM HAD STARTED AN USHER IN A UNIFORM WOULD ESCORT YOU
    AND SEAT YOU WITH A FLASHLIGHT. THE USHERS WERE GEORGE
    AND LINKY LAYOU TWO BROTHERS THEY LIVED ON WEST PETTEBONE
    A GREAT TIME IN THAT PART OF HISTORY…THE LINES WERE LONG
    WAITING FOR THE SECOND SHOW AT NINE.. MRS NESBITT FROM
    DILLEY ST. WAS THE CLEANING WOMAN. SHE KEPT IT IN GREAT SHAPE…
    TY-KEY TOLD ME IN 1986 AT THE COFFEE SHOP THAT THE DAY
    HIS BROTHERS PICK HIM UP WHEN HE GOT DISCHARGED FROM
    THE SERVICE THAT HIS DAD HAD DIED THAT DAY….

    • tom says:

      Hi Harold:

      I have heard a couple of the names you mentioned over the years. Thank you so much for sharing your memories.

  3. Jerri (Stanulis) Huber says:

    My childhood friend, Laura Gower, and I attended the Lassie movies with pockets full of tissues because we knew that we would enjoy (?) a good cry. Laura was not a quiet sobber…her cries would often drown out the dialogue. We loved the Saturday matinees, but Lassie films were our favorites. I moved away after high school and eventually moved to New Jersey, but every trip home took me past the Forty-Fort Theater…a fond remembrance of the past.

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